3 Story: The Secret History of the Giant Man by Matt Kindt

Matt Kindt’s short and very poetic story of a modern life Gulliver, a fictitious gentle ever-growing giant lost in the post-war 50s, 60s and the 70s in the US is very nostalgic, melancholic and even somewhat sad. A tale of three women – his single mother, widow of a WWII vet, his wife, shrinking and diminishing by the day, locked in a tower of glass and steel, and his daughter who grew fatherless – all of whom eventually lost him, gave up on his deformity – or rather, they were finding ways of coping with it, which included, inter alia parting ways. 

Beautifully scripted and drawn, it requires a certain slow-food like approach, savoring it bit by bit – otherwise you speed though those bare 200 pages, chew on them and digest, and zas, the story (well, the third story) ends. Don’t rush. 


Индейское лето Мило Манара и Уго Пратта

Краткая и немного пустая книга от Мило Манара и Уго Пратта, жестокое повествование о резне поселенцев и индейцев в 16 веке, о промискуитете и инцесте, о странной жестокости во времена ранних колонизаторов Америки. The story of Scarlett Letter, адаптированная и сокращённая.

Типический итальянский комикс из 80-х – несмотря на легкую эротику, как-то без особых восторгов. 


Akira volume 1: Tetsuo by Katsuhiro Otomo

Katsuhiro Otomo’s volume 1 of Akira series is all about action and adventure. Not really something that I look for in comic books and manga, but it is worthwhile to flip though such classic pieces of the genre every once in a while. 


Patience by Daniel Clowes

Patience, Daniel Clowes‘ 2016 story on travel in time, a hectic run to save a pregnant girl from imminent murder, 2012, 2029, 2006, 1985, and 2012 again, is a colorful and witty tale, which, sadly, reeks of its background liberal and socialist agenda, aiming to solve all the injustices in this world by violence and even more injustice.

Clever and fast-paced, without doubt, but there are way too many science fiction novels on the matter that could easily best it. Say, All You Need is Kill is a great example.


Mary wept over the feet of Jesus: Prostitution and religious obedience in the Bible by Chester Brown

img_0025Given a hell of controversy this may spark, I’d rather leave this review intentionally blanc. The title is self-explanatory. Read the book and decide for yourself.


My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies by Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips

KOBK_15A short new graphic novel by the duo of Brubaker and Phillips falls in the tracks of their well known Criminal series, it’s is indeed another short noir story. A wrong man meets a wrong woman. What makes it different is the combination of striking blue and yellow colors, more shameless and alluring than I would expect.

A brief easy read.


Berlin by Jason Lutes

img_9978-1A book that took three installments and 23 years to complete. I think I stumbled on Book One: City of Stones back in 2007 or so, and then got hold Book Two: City of Smoke immediately thereafter, in 2008 when it was out, and had been patiently waiting for the finale, Book Three: City of Light which finally came out this September. All three under one hardcover and read in one go, brilliant.

Deep and sincere, it’s a multi-layered interconnected tale of a big group of people, rich and poor, politically motivated and careless, all residents in the city of Berlin during the Weimar Republic in 1928-1933, the Jazz era, a short intermission for peace, with fascism, intolerance and hatred slowly and masterfully creeping in.

The band is still playing – yet children get hurt, mothers are shot, families break down and turn on each other, free love is persecuted, a tall blond man is marching with a black band on his arm and shiny suspenders in full sight, and then a small man, he with ridiculously trimmed mini-mustache is making a couple of brief cameo appearances here.

Fills your heart with sadness, with loss of liberty, youth and innocence, and with little hope. Lives are wasted, and the city, burnt and captured, cut in two pieces with a butcher’s knife and then sewn back together, the city still stands. Uh-huh. Well, could I expected anything else?

Picture: Carl von Ossietzky, the recipient of the 1935 Nobel Peace Prize

Blankets by Craig Thompson

img_9375An honest and somewhat clumsy autobiographical graphic novel by Craig Thompson, his first major success, a thick 9-part book about growing up in snowy rural Minnesota, about young boy’s religious acceptance, god fearing reverence, affection, love, and subsequent denial of god, and on finally moving on.

While Blankets is a critically acclaimed masterpiece of modern comic book storytelling, I remain a much bigger fan of Thompson’s next story called Habibi, a much harsher tale of love, poverty, almost medieval violence and bigotry. To me, Blankets vs Habibi is a good US indie flick vs a major groundbreaking Scorsese biopic.


Опус Сатоси Кона

Неплохая мета-манга, матрешка от создателя аниме Паприка Сатоси Кона, a nesting doll inside a nesting doll inside a nesting doll. Здесь нет, конечно, той глубины и накала повествования, как у классиков жанра типа Осаму Тезука – но, в целом, весьма и весьма ничего.

Присмотрюсь к другим книгам издательства Alt-Graph, которое взвалило на себе нерентабельное бремя печатать мангу. Хм


Habibi by Craig Thompson

An utterly moving yet harsh, cruel and absolutely unexpected graphic novel by Craig Thompson, a much praised comic book artist whose earlier novel Blankets I conveniently missed and now will catch up for sure.

Despite the fact that its almost 700 pages are full of gruesome violence, horrendous child abuse, victimization of women, lust for the underaged, slavery, female torture and executions, self-mutilation, pain and agony, Habibi is but a precious gem. A story of love that goes beyond hardship, beyond pain and suffering, beyond hatred and loss of manhood, beyond the will of cruel rulers and the deeds of cruel men.

It's a roller coaster of Thompson's vivid imagination and no less disturbing imagery, married and intertwined with quotes, fables and passages from the Bible and the Quran.

One of a kind. A brilliant piece of storytelling.